Category Archives: Office

Hide Slide Parts in PowerPoint

Hide PowerPoint Slide Objects

Sometimes you have a part or parts (objects) on a slide that you want to use again but that box (placeholder) information doesn’t apply to a current situation. You could create a duplicate slide and delete or edit the information but PowerPoint has an easier solution.

Available in PowerPoint 2007 and above.

Hiding PowerPoint Slide objects

Use the Selection Pane to Hide Slide Parts

This feature is especially helpful if this is a slide presentation that is used frequently. No messing around with deleting or duplicating. Here’s how to hide objects on the slide until you need to use them again:

  • On the Home tab, Editing group, click the drop down arrow on Select
  • Choose Selection Pane…

A task pane displays on the right side of your slides (can be dragged to left side if you prefer)

The elements (placeholders) will be listed for the current slide (shown here in example), and identify Title, Shapes, Pictures, Slide numbers, text boxes (anything that is an object). You can also rename the objects in the Selection Pane to make it clear what they represent.

Example of Show/Hide PowerPoint object with Selection Pane

Use the Icons to Display and Hide

I don’t want the “Free through Saturday!” to display on the slide currently but will use it later so don’t want to delete the placeholder:

  • Click on the placeholder border in the slide to select that text box which will automatically highlight its item name in the Selection Pane. (You can also click its item name in the Selection Pane and the box will be selected).
  • Click the eye icon to the right of the item name.      Use the eye icon to show/hide PowerPoint slide objects
    • That placeholder is now hidden and the eye becomes a line.
  • Click the line to display the object on the slide again.

You can hide/display any parts of a slide without editing. PowerPoint will accommodate with the Selection Pane details as long as it can identify as an object.

Note: The slide image example above represents an actual eBook of mine available on Amazon as shown. However, it is not free, so if this was an actual slide presentation, I would remove that placeholder. If you would like to be notified of any free promotion, just fill out the signup form on this page and get a free cheat sheet of Office tips while you wait!

If you are doing narrations, creating video or using PowerPoint for teaching or demonstration, take a gander at my blog for using Office Mix to take your PowerPoint to a new level.       http://gaylelarson.com/share-powerpoints-office-mix/

Have you played with the Selection Pane? How are you using this feature to organize slide presentations?  Thanks for reading and comment below.

Save Word Document as PDF

Save an Office Document in PDF Format

Word file as PDF

A PDF is the perfect solution for a Word or other type of Office document when we don’t know if the intended viewer has MS Office, or we don’t want them to be able to change our content. Saving as a PDF allows opening, viewing, printing and saving but not editing our original (except for last couple of versions of Word – see note). *

You can use the File | Export | Create PDF/XPS Document command from the Ribbon or the Save As dialog box to create a PDF. Both methods have the same result but use a little different path to get there.

If you want just a portion of your document to be saved as a PDF, select that section before you publish or save as a PDF. It is also a good idea to save as a regular Word document before creating the PDF. Just sayin’…

Export as a PDF Document

Create your PDF from the File tab:

Click File | Export and click Create the PDF/XPS icon on lower right


This displays the Publish as PDF or XPS dialog box:

  • Change the file name and location for saving, if desired
  • PDF is automatically chosen in the Save as type: box
  • The Open file after publishing box should be automatically checked
  • Click the Options… button for choosing to capture specific pages or a selection (if you highlighted previously) or for removing Document Properties which may contain sensitive information. Be aware it is checked by default.
  • Click the Publish button at the bottom to display the file in your default reader software (newer computers will have this automatically installed, such as Adobe Reader)
  • Close the PDF reader to return to your document

Save As Dialog Box for PDF

The F12 function key automatically brings up the Save As dialog box in all Office applications and then you can choose PDF as the format. This is the same as File | Save As but bypasses the Backstage and the extra steps:

Press the F12 function key to display the Save As dialog box

  • Change the file name if desired
  • Choose PDF in the drop down in the Save as type: box
  • The Open file after publishing box should be automatically checked
  • Click the Options… button for additional choices (same as above)
  • Click Save when completed to display the file in your default reader
  • Create Save As PDF Shortcut on Quick Access Toolbar

If you need to create PDF’s on a regular basis, put a shortcut on the QAT. This is in two steps as you’ll create a shortcut icon for multiple formats, and then use that one for making a shortcut icon just for creating a PDF:

  • Right click on the Ribbon or Quick Access toolbar (QAT)
  • Choose Customize Quick Access Toolbar
  • Choose All Commands from the Choose commands from: drop down box
  • Wheel down to: Save As Other Format: (the one with the arrow at the right)
  • Click Add button and relocate position with arrow boxes, if desired
  • Click OK

Once back in your document, you can now create a PDF shortcut with the new QAT shortcut:

  • Click the drop down arrow on your new Save As icon on the QAT to see the list of available formats
  • Right click over PDF or XPS and choose Add to Quick Access toolbar
  • You now have icons for saving as a PDF and Save As other formats 

As you can see, there are several ways to get the job done. Whether you use Publish or Save As dialog boxes is a matter of preference but I vote for the PDF shortcut on the QAT for easy peasy!

*Note:  If you (or your viewer) has Word 2013 or above, ,PDF’s can be opened in Word as Word converts them to a regular document, so just be aware if you have previously used PDF specifically for document protection!

You can save other Office files as a PDF as well. The Excel process is pretty similar to above but there are differences in PowerPoint, Access and OneNote and will cover those in a future post.

Have you saved PDF’s on a regular basis and used other methods? 

Copy and Paste Filtered Subtotals or Visible Cells Only in Excel

Copy and Paste Visible Cells Only (filtered data)

You have used one of several methods to hide some rows for filtered data, or created a table which auto applies filter icons for each column. Now you want to copy and paste just the visible data but discovered to your horror when you pasted to another location, it included the hidden rows!

Excel, Paste only Filtered Data

By default, Excel copies hidden or filtered cells in addition to visible cells. If you want only visible rows, here’s the steps:

  • Select the cell range that you want to copy.
  • Click Home tab, Find & Select in the Editing group and choose Go To Special
  • Click Special… button in the dialog box.
  • Click Visible cells only radio button and click OK.

Excel, Copy and Paste Filtered Cells Only

  • Click Copy in Clipboard group on Home tab (or press CTRL+C).
  • Click the upper-left cell of the desired paste area and click Paste (or press CTRL+V).

You have now achieved Nirvana!

Tip: You can also use the F5 Function key at Step 2 to bring up the Go To… dialog box and click the Special… button to get the same results.

Add the Icon for Select Visible Cells to the Quick Access Toolbar

Make this great solution even easier and faster by utilizing the Quick Access Toolbar (QAT):

  • Right click anywhere in the Ribbon and choose Customize Quick Access Toolbar… OR click the QAT dropdown arrow, and choose More Commands
  • From the Choose Commands From dropdown, choose All Commands.
  • Scroll down and click Select Visible Cells.
  • Click Add and then click OK to add to end of the QAT.
  • If desired, use the arrow boxes to change the icon’s position on the toolbar.

Now all you do is select the range, click the Select Visible Cells icon on the QAT, Copy and Paste – One and done!

Copy and Paste Only Subtotaled Rows

You’ve used the SUBTOTAL function to sum only filtered data and now want to copy and paste to another location. You assume the paste will include the visible subtotaled rows only – Surprise – not! You still need to use the Go To dialog box to accomplish this but if this is something you do often, apply shortcuts:

  • Select the range you want to copy. (Excel is actually selecting the hidden rows as well but this will get taken care of in the next steps).
  • Press F5 function key to display Go To dialog box.

Excel, Copy and Paste only Subtotaled, filtered Rows with Special...

  • Click the Special… button at the bottom of the dialog box.
  • Click Visible Cells Only to select only the visible cells in the selected range.

  • Click OK (or just hit ENTER key as OK is already selected).
  • Press CTRL C to copy the selected visible cells to the Clipboard.
  • Select a destination cell (can be on the same sheet, a different sheet, or on a new workbook).
  • Paste the range by pressing CTRL V. Excel copies only the subtotaled rows.

Now you can copy and paste only those cells or ranges YOU want.

Hope these tips have removed a little head-scratching from one of those features that we want to use on a regular basis but doesn’t always behave the way we expect!

Microsoft Snip, Windows Newest Screen Capture Tool

Snip Vs. The Snipping Tool

The new, free Snip tool takes the familiar Windows Snipping Tool that has been included in the Accessories folder of the operating system (in any version above XP) to a new level. While the Snipping Tool is a great screen capture tool and includes basic annotation and highlighting features, it lacks some capabilities found in Microsoft Snip.

Snip is one of several “garage” projects created by Microsoft employees who are being encouraged to create apps outside of the regular Windows and Office programs. How awesome is that! It is not included but can be downloaded free to Windows 7 and above. You can download it here and also see examples of how people use this tool: Download Here

Windows Snip, Show and Tell

Snip has three main steps of Capture, Annotate and Share and different ways to make that happen. A great feature is that it saves each capture in a Library so that you can use the snips again. It also allows voice recording, and saving as MP4 video.

Screen Capture with Snip

Once installed and opened, the dialog box will position itself at the top center of your window but you can drag it to any border or float it anywhere on your screen.

Activate a screen capture with the by clicking the Capture icon or pressing the PrtScrn keyboard shortcut which is automatically assigned.

Windows Snip, Print Screen key

You can click on the icons directly for the specific type of capture. The main menu is divided into three primary functions, Capture, Whiteboard and Camera.

Windows Snip, Capture toolbar

Snip Editor Toolbar

If the PrtScrn key is pressed or the Capture icon clicked and either the whole screen or a portion selected, the Snip Editor toolbar displays with options to record, annotate, highlight, and more.

Captures are automatically copied to the Windows Clipboard and any audio added will automatically be converted to a MP4 file. You can then embed on websites, play as video and/or save to desired location.

Windows Snip, Snip Editor toolbar

The Capture button can be used to get screen shots by either cropping the desirable section or by capturing the entire screen. The default selection is generally entire screen and can be captured with a click or by pressing Enter which displays the Snip Editor above.

Whiteboard is more like an extended paint tool and it will let you highlight and scribble and simultaneously explain what you are doing through voice recording.

Last but definitely not least, is the Camera capture button, which simply switches on your webcam and allows you to take a picture of yourself. Editing options are same for Capture, Whiteboard and Camera.

Note: The Record button records the annotations and other screen actions as well as any voice audio you use to explain your onscreen activity. The screen can be shared by email or saved to your hard drive.

Customize Options for Snip Tool

There aren’t many but you can control a couple of things from the Settings icon on the Snip Editor toolbar. If you don’t want the PrntScrn key to auto capture the screen, you can remove that shortcut. There is a delay feature but I haven’t found any reason to use it as, unlike the Snipping Tool, you can capture drop-down menus and dialog boxes by displaying them, then pressing the PrntScrn key (which is why I leave it active) – a huge advantage!

Windows Snip, Snip Editor Settings

Take a screenshot in Windows 10 and Windows 8

Windows 8 and 10 users can press the Windows and PrntScrn keys together to capture the entire screen and the image will automatically save to a Screenshot folder inside of the Pictures library. Earlier Windows versions copy to the Clipboard.

Take a screenshot on a Windows tablet or smartphone

Windows tablet owners can take a screenshot by pressing both the Windows button and Volumedown key at the same time. The image will auto save in the Screenshots folder in the Pictures library.

On a Windows 8.1 Phone, you do this by pressing the Power button and Volumeup key together. On Windows 8 phones, press the Start button and Power button at the same time. Screenshots are automatically saved in the Photos
Hub section

Summary

It is exciting to see Microsoft releasing these “garage” projects that are innovative and free. Although there are many other programs that can do the same or similar things to Snip, most are not free (definitely a bonus)! Other ventures from Microsoft include Sway (online creative graphics) and Mix for PowerPoint which you can download into that application. Along with the purchase of other programs such as Wunderlist and LinkedIn, there seems to be a move towards creative features that can be used in both Office 365 and Windows.

Want to try Mix? Go to my blog post on Mix here for more information: PowerPoint Mix on gaylelarson.com

Go here to see my previous post on the Windows Snipping Tool: Windows Snipping tool blog on gaylelarson.com

Have you played with Snip? What feature do you like best?

Display Results of Formula Inside Cell During Creation

Would you like to see the values displayed when you are entering a formula but a little fuzzy on how to make that happen?

Get clarity displaying formula values in cell

There are times when you may want to examine the results of a complicated formula from others or as you are creating one inside the cell. This can save time and frustration and avoid the dreaded error message after you hit ENTER or TAB.

If you want to look at the results of a particular part of a formula as you type, or after you or someone else has entered it, use a couple of function keys to complete the process.

Display Formula Values During Formula Creation

Here is a simple example of how handy this can be where we are adding sales of only two of the products, adding fees and dividing by cost, with the formula being entered in H9:

=(B9+E9)*G9/F9

Example displaying formula values in the cell

If I want to know the value of G9/F9 before completing the formula, I can do this directly in the cell.

  1. In the results cell (in this case, H9), type the formula.
  2. Select the part of the formula whose value you want to see. Here, it would be G9/F9.
  3. Press F9. Excel replaces that part of the formula with its result.

Selected portion of formula displays values

If this is the correct result, press ENTER or TAB, and Excel completes the formula and moves to requested cell. You could also press ESC to return to your formula and stay in the cell. Be careful here. If you are creating, not editing a previous entry, ESC will revert to whatever the cell contents were prior to your entry (such as a blank cell).

Display Formula Values Editing Existing Formula

If the formula already exists and you want to display the value, the steps are the same except you need to be in Edit mode in the cell:

  1. Click in the cell and press F2 to edit the formula in the cell. *
  2. Select the part of the formula whose value you want to see (G9/F9).
  3. Press F9. Excel replaces that part of the formula with its result.

*Note: Since the content already exists, you could also double click in the cell to edit. Only difference is that F2 places your insert marker at the end of the contents, and wherever you double click, the insert displays at that point.

Use the Ribbon to Evaluate Formula

There is another way to evaluate a formula by each cell reference – Select the Formulas tab, Formula Auditing group and click on Evaluate formula icon to bring up the Evaluate dialog box.

Example of Evaluate Formula dialog box

Click Evaluate button to see formula results as you move through each cell reference. This is a great way to walk through a formula you are not too familiar with and/or someone else created and has you scratching your head.

Now you can know what is going on in your worksheet before you press Print or Send!

Let me know if you have used these features or how they can help you in the future…

Insert a Drop Cap in Microsoft Word

Why Use a Drop Cap?

The beauty of a drop cap

A drop cap can be fancy or plain but it catches the eye. Ever wonder how that novel you are reading displays a large, decorative dropped capital at the beginning of each chapter? Yep, that’s what it is – a great way to dress up a report, book, quote, invitation card, or any writing where you want to make a visual impact.

Word makes it very easy to insert a drop cap in any paragraph to add a little drama to your masterpiece! The drop cap is two lines by default but that can be customized.

Add a Drop Cap

  • Click anywhere in the paragraph where you want to apply the drop cap.
  • Click on the INSERT tab, in the Text group, drop down arrow on Drop Cap.

  • To insert a drop cap that fits within your paragraph, select Dropped.

  • To create a drop cap that is in the margin, outside of your paragraph, select In margin.

  • To change the font or size of the drop cap or adjust its distance from your text, choose Drop Cap Options at the bottom of the list. Experiment with some of the script fonts for variety and effect.

Remove a drop cap

  1. Click in the paragraph that contains the drop cap.
  2. Click on the INSERT tab, in the Text group, click Drop Cap | None.

Note: You can also create a drop cap in Outlook, using the same commands on the ribbon.

Might want to be a little careful with this one and not overuse it. It is a good design tool for the first paragraph of each chapter in a book. Could be applied more in other types of writing such as declarations, poetry or inspirational works, for example. Experiment with it, and your eye will tell you if you have overdone it!

How would you use this in what you create?

Convert Bullets to SmartArt in PowerPoint

Even dogs can't take "Death by PowerPoint"
When your presentation has gone to the dogs…

In spite of the warnings, (can you spell “Death by PowerPoint?”), who can resist the multiple bulleted list on at least a couple of slides? Your audience has read the points before you can talk about them so their eyes glaze over or they are tweeting while you speak. Wow them instead by using SmartArt to display great graphics that make your point without a bullet in sight!

Here’s the usual (yawn) bulleted list slide:

You know it is exciting information that they need to have but  they won’t get it if you can’t keep their attention. Less text and more graphics is the way to go.

Transform That List to a Graphic

You can convert each point to an object and leave the original text or, better yet, reduce the amount of text and explain the rest. Here’s the steps:

  • Select the bulleted list on the slide
  • Click Home tab; Paragraph group; Convert to SmartArt icon
  • Roll mouse over graphics to see live preview and choose a shape
  • Apply color changes, special effects, etc., from the Design and Format ribbon tabs

Now, in a few mouse clicks, your bulleted list can become a graphic…

Edit the text to one or two words in large font on each object, and there you go!

More Convert to SmartArt Options

Here’s another example of quickly changing normal bullet points to a Smart Art graphic style and then changing the special effects and color scheme:

After selecting the bulleted list, explore the SmartArt Graphic choices under Convert to SmartArt in the Paragraph group on the Home tab. It is Live Preview so you get to see the effect as you mouse over the options:

Format SmartArt Graphics with Color and Style

Quickly apply some special effects in the SmartArt Styles group on the SmartArt Tools Design tab for something like this:

Now, change the color scheme with the Change Colors drop down arrow:

Your slides will never be boring again!

You can also change the properties of parts of the main object by clicking them separately. Use Design and Format in SmartArt Tools on the Ribbon to apply different colors and special effects for objects and text.

TIP:  Use keyboard shortcuts to gain even more control by breaking up each box/graphic with CTRL SHFT G. You can then treat each object separately. Each one can have its own personality! When formatting is complete, if desired, group them as one object with CTRL G. (This allows applying same formatting all at once and/or moving the parts as one object).

No more excuses for bland presentations. Are you using this great feature? Tell me what you changed to make your PowerPoints shine!

Balancing Column Lengths in Word Document

Do your column lengths look a little out of balance in that otherwise perfect document?

Have you struggled with creating columns in Word to get that nice, professional look only to have them display off balance, with one column much longer than the other(s)? Here’s some ways to whip that into shape!

Word allows you to give your work a more magazine or newspaper look by breaking up the document or specific paragraphs into columns. You can have Word do this automatically, or specify where you want the column breaks.

Deciding the number of columns will be based on your margins, font sizes, line and paragraph spacing, graphics and any additional settings. The fast, easy way is to let Word do the lifting.

Have Word Create Column Breaks Based on Selection

If you want specific content to be displayed in columns:

  • Select the contents that you want to display in two or more columns
  • Click the Layout tab on the Ribbon
  • In the Page Setup group, choose the drop down on Columns
  • Choose the number of desired columns

Word will automatically add section breaks at the top and bottom of the column content and make the columns as even as possible. If you add content at the end of the column(s), Word will rebalance them.

Inserting Columns with No Content Selected

If you want the entire document displayed in columns, click anywhere in the document, and follow the steps above.

The difference here is that Word does not insert section breaks so will not automatically adjust column lengths as you add content.

If the columns are not equal length, you can have Word do it by inserting a continuous section break at the end of the last column:

  1.  Click at the end of the text in the last column
  2.  Display the Page Layout tab of the ribbon
  3.  Click on the drop-down on Breaks in the Page Setup group
  4. Choose Continuous under Section Breaks section


Note: If you like the results, you are good to go but if you want to change the column widths or adjust space between columns, you can select the More
Columns… command at the bottom of the Columns drop down.

Although Word is not a full-blown desktop publisher such as InDesign or even Publisher, it can produce some pretty fine looking work just by using some built-in templates or tools. There are more adjustments you can make such as having your heading (and other content) be in one column and the rest of the document in multiple columns. We’ll look at that in a future post.

Have you used this feature in Word before? Did you get the expected results? If you haven’t experimented with columns, give it a try and let me know how it went!

Create and Add a Signature to Outlook Email Messages

These Signature features are available in Outlook 2007+

How to Create One or More Signatures in Outlook Email

Multiple personalized signatures can be created for your Outlook email messages. They can include images, logos, text or even an image of your handwritten signature or your electronic business card.

Signatures can be selected for each email or a default one created to be automatically added to all outgoing messages. For example, you could create one for personal use, business(es), and organizations you represent.

Steps to create Signatures

Note: If you already have a signature block set up somewhere, you can copy and paste it into the Signatures feature rather than creating from scratch at Step 5 below.

Signatures can be set up in File | Options | Mail | Signatures but a much quicker way is to just create them directly from the Inbox:

  • Create New Email icon (or CTRL N)
  • On the Message tab | Include group, click Signature drop down and then the Signatures… button


  • In the Select signature to edit box, choose New, and in the New Signature dialog box, typename to identify the signature.
  • Under Choose default signature, set these options:
    • In the E-mail account list, choose an email account to associate with the signature. You can have different signatures for each email account.
    • In the New messages list, choose the signature that you want to be added automatically to all new email messages. If you don’t want to auto sign your new email messages, accept the default option of (none).
    • In the Replies/forwards list, choose the signature that you want to be added automatically (auto sign) when you reply to or forward messages. Otherwise, accept the default option of (none).
  • Under Edit signature, type the signature (or paste, if already created), and then click OK.


Use the formatting toolbar above the text box to change font, size, color, and note the icons on the right for inserting pictures (logos) and also social media icons and links.

Note: This signature was created in Word to take advantage of the robust formatting features and then copied and pasted into the signature block.

Each new message you create from now on will auto insert your default signature (if you selected that option).

Insert a Created Signature Manually

If you don’t want to insert a signature automatically for all new messages or replies and forwards, insert a signature manually:

  • Inside the email message, click the drop down arrow on Signature icon in the Include group on the ribbon,
  • Choose desired signature from the list

Signatures in Office 365 Outlook on the Web

Note: If using Outlook on the Web (also business edition) in Office 365, you need to create a signature in each one. (The desktop Outlook signature will not automatically transfer to Outlook on the Web or Outlook.com).

Automatically Add Your Signature to Every Message in Web Outlook

If the signature has already been created, you can have it auto added to all outgoing messages (including replies and forwards):

Sign in to Outlook Web App

Click App launcher  grid and choose Outlook:

  • Click the gear icon at upper right and choose Settings | Options
  • Under Options, choose Settings | Mail (or Mail | Layout | Email
    signature)
  • Under Email signature, click or clear the Automatically include my signature on messages I send check box to either include or exclude your signature at the bottom of all outgoing messages

Manually adding signatures in Web Outlook is the same as Outlook.com below except that there is an Insert command on the Menu bar where you can select Signature for individual emails.

Insert Signature in Outlook.com Email

Automatic for Every Message

  • In Outlook Mail, click the gear icon at upper right on button bar
  • Click Options
  • Click Email signature under Layout
  • Under Email signature, click or clear the Automatically include my signature on messages I send and the forward or reply check boxes to either include or exclude your signature at the bottom of all outgoing messages.
  • Click Save

Manually Insert a Signature for Individual Emails

In your Outlook Mail screen:

  • Create New Email
  • Click the ellipsis (three dots) at end of Menu bar above email form
  • Click Insert signature
  • Type or paste desired signature in the Add a message… box
  • Use the Insert Picture icon at the bottom of the form to add a logo or graphic

  • Create or paste your signature with or without graphic…


Now you have all the parts of your life covered!

Have you created multiple signatures or do you use the same one for all emails? Let me know in the Comments below.

More ways to make Outlook work for you… Taming tips for Email! 

Remove Formatting from a Word Document

Formatting Frenzy!

Yikes! Did you create or inherit a document that has more font formats and colors than a box of crayons and you want it gone? There’s an app for that, so to speak!

Remove Regular Font Formatting

Microsoft Word, awesome as it is, packs a gaggle of formatting behind the scenes. Often that is not an issue unless you run into a situation where it gets in the way of inserting, exporting or pasting into another document or program.

What you need to do depends on how much you want to get rid of. If you received a file that contains different font styles, sizes and colors, etc., and you want it instantly reset to the default, just press CTRL + SPACEBAR. Presto! You are all set to start from scratch.

Remove Styles Formatting

Word has built-in styles that make formatting a sophisticated document quick and easy. However, they contain a lot of underlying formatting and CTRL SPACEBAR will not remove Style formatting. Styles live on the Home tab | Styles group and have their own formatting.

To remove Applied Styles within Word:

  • Click the More button at the end of the Styles group (Home tab)

  • Click Clear Formatting command at the bottom of the Style icons

  • Styles are now removed from all selected text.

If your document has a lot of varied formatting including Styles, the best way to ensure it is all stripped is to use a text editor, and get it done all at once.

Use Notepad to Remove ALL Formatting from a Document

The above fixes work great for superficial formatting but If you need to strip all formatting, you need to send the text to a text editor such as Notepad. This is an accessory program built into the Windows operating system (along with some other handy mini-programs such as WordPad, Paint, Calculator, and the popular Snipping Tool). Notepad is available in all versions of Windows, as are most of the other tools.

Steps to strip all formatting:

  1. Select desired text or CTRL A to select entire document
  2. Cut or Copy the selection to the Clipboard
  3. Open the Notepad accessory (just click on Start button and type “notepad” to display it at top of Search. Click it to open the program)
  4. Paste your Clipboard contents into the Notepad window

All formatting for your text is instantly removed. Copy and paste it back into Word and/or you could also save it as a text file.

Your document is now clean and lean and ready to be beautified!

Tip: If you will use this method on a regular basis, pin Notepad to the taskbar. Right click on the Notepad icon and choose Pin to taskbar, and it will stay there until you “unpin” it.

Did you get to try it? Let me know!

Want more information on Word Styles? See my post on streamlining your document with the amazing Styles!  http://gaylelarson.com/word-styles-make-formatting-easy-peasy/